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 Frankenstein's Monster as a Villain

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GoldenBard

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PostSubject: Frankenstein's Monster as a Villain   Tue Jul 29, 2014 11:32 pm

As much as I loved Koontz’s series and the use of Frankenstein’s Creature as a hero (and I’ve seen others do the same thing recently), in a recent consideration of villains I could possibly use for an upcoming project, the Creature came to mind. The more I considered it, the more I like the idea. Because writing helps me think, I thought I’d share what I came up with.

First of all, I went back to the original source material (and if all you know is the Creature as he’s appeared in the movies, go download either the book from Project Gutenberg or the audiobook from Librivox right now). So, the Creature is between 7 & 8 feet tall, well proportioned, with skin like yellow parchment that’s pulled so tight that you can practically see the muscles and blood vessels working beneath it. His lips are black and his eyes rheumy and watery. His only good features are his perfect white teeth and his long, lustrous black hair (which I would have him keep pulled back in a ponytail). Like in subsequent versions of the tale, the Monster is incredibly strong; what most miss is that in the original the Creature is also very graceful and quick (not the lumbering hulk that Karloff portrayed). I envision him in an outfit with Victorian lines, including a long, high-collared coat. He has no sleeves, showing his muscular arms to highlight his power (and intimidate his enemies).

When last seen, the Creature was on a ship north of the Arctic Circle (after Frankenstein’s death), planning to go off and throw himself on his own funeral pyre, disappointed in not ever gaining the love of his creator (whom he saw as a father). I can see the Creature wandering the ice floes, slowly becoming angrier at his loss, eventually coming to the conclusion that, because he didn’t feel the cold, didn’t need to eat, indeed, that he might not even be able to die short of being destroyed, he was a higher being than man. So over the years, he made his way back to civilization, pausing only to steal what he needed (including information) to become more powerful. Working behind the scenes, he’s crafted a vast criminal network devoted to world domination.

I’m just not sure of a name for this villain. I can’t see him taking the name of his doctor-creator, but I’d like to give him a name that evokes that character. I’m thinking of Tuisto. Frankenstein was Swiss, and I believe there was a (minor) historical connection between Switzerland and Germany. According to Germanic mythology, Tuisto was a first man, ancestor of the Germanic peoples, and son of the sky-god Tui. Seem like a name that a megalomaniac with the Creature’s pedigree might claim.
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malpanda



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PostSubject: Re: Frankenstein's Monster as a Villain   Sun Aug 31, 2014 3:19 pm

"Tuisto" does _sound_ like a master villain's name. Its relative obscurity hints at his high intelligence and vast years of experience wandering the earth. Also, it suggests the word "twist", as in "twisted reflection of Man", "twisted sense of morality" and "twist the plans of others into parts of his grand secret conspiracy".
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GoldenBard

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PostSubject: Re: Frankenstein's Monster as a Villain   Wed Sep 03, 2014 11:00 am

malpanda wrote:
"Tuisto" does _sound_ like a master villain's name. Its relative obscurity hints at his high intelligence and vast years of experience wandering the earth. Also, it suggests the word "twist", as in "twisted reflection of Man", "twisted sense of morality" and "twist the plans of others into parts of his grand secret conspiracy".

Thanks, you bring up some great points. At first I was afraid that the name didn't sound "evil" enough, but the "twisted" connection does seem to work... The more I think about it, the more it grows on me. If I ever find the time to write again, I think Tuisto will pretty much be guaranteed a role as villain in some story...
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MikeDiBaggio

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PostSubject: Re: Frankenstein's Monster as a Villain   Mon Sep 08, 2014 9:09 am

Many Swiss are ethnically part of the broader Germanic peoples, and many speak German (German is one of the official languages of Switzerland). I agree with malpanda that the obscurity of the name hints at a more sophisticated and intelligent character. I like this concept a lot, and I think the idea of an intelligent and subtle Creature has a lot of merit to it.
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captainwhizz

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PostSubject: Re: Frankenstein's Monster as a Villain   Sun Oct 05, 2014 11:04 pm

I like the idea of the monster as an anti-villain, or anti-hero, some sort of grey area. I like the idea of him being an antagonist, but someone who still has (his own, twisted) codes of morality and honour. I want to say a little of Dr. Doom, but I think that imagery takes you too far. But someone does villainous things, yet will not cross certain lines that other villains would. I'm sure I'm missing a really obvious equivalent, but I can't think right now.

But basically, he has firm belief that what he is doing is justified by what he believes is right, and doesn't see himself as the villain. Like Gerard Butler's character in Law Abiding Citizen, or the Operative from Serenity. Maybe a bit of Magneto.
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GoldenBard

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PostSubject: Re: Frankenstein's Monster as a Villain   Mon Oct 06, 2014 10:39 am

I hear what you're saying, Captain, and I think that's a neat way to play the character. After all, the Creature isn't really "human" so why would he feel bound by human ideas of morality?
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captainwhizz

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PostSubject: Re: Frankenstein's Monster as a Villain   Tue Oct 07, 2014 3:12 am

Humanity shuns him, and he in turn rejects human society, considering himself superior. Arrogant, aloof, maybe he sees himself working to improve society, to educate humanity? Or perhaps he has his own goals of creating a new superior race like himself, and the impact of his work on lowly humans is beneath his concern?
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